Our Philosophy
Ethnocide is the destruction of the culture and identity of a group without the physical destruction of its people”
- Barrett Holmes Pitner
ETHNOCIDE
Raphael Lemkin: From Genocide to Ethnocide

In 1944, Raphael Lemkin, a Polish Jew who immigrated to America as he fled the Nazis, coined the words genocide and ethnocide. Lemkin intended for the words to be interchangeable because the mass atrocities inflicted upon the Jewish people in Germany and the Armenians in Turkey sought to murder (-cide) the people (genos) and culture (ethnos) of a society.

While the term genocide came into more common usage and ethnocide remained in the footnotes of history, the denial and destruction of culture became a systemic tool for perpetual oppression and inequality that persists today.

In the United States, the ethnocidal policies of European colonialism and the transatlantic slave trade continue to reverberate on the way Americans live today.

Read the book
Ethnocide In America

The united states’ involvement in the transatlantic slave trade created a perpetual culture of ethnocide in the Americas.


European colonizers forcefully extracted and denied african culture to african people in order to enslave, oppress, and exploit them indefinitely. America’s social, racial, political, and financial inequality and division are founded upon ethnocide, which continues to shape american society today.


Unlike its linguistic sibling, the “final solution” of ethnocide is not the eradication or removal of a people, but the creation of a society dependent upon the perpetual oppression and exploitation of a specific segment of its population.


American society succumbs to the ravages of ethnocide because we are unaware of its existence. Thus far, the lack of a cultural philosophy, language, and methodology to combat ethnocidal systemic oppression has prevented america from combatting a crime that previously went unnamed.

Ethnocide In America

The united states’ involvement in the transatlantic slave trade created a perpetual culture of ethnocide in the Americas.


European colonizers forcefully extracted and denied african culture to african people in order to enslave, oppress, and exploit them indefinitely. America’s social, racial, political, and financial inequality and division are founded upon ethnocide, which continues to shape american society today.


Unlike its linguistic sibling, the “final solution” of ethnocide is not the eradication or removal of a people, but the creation of a society dependent upon the perpetual oppression and exploitation of a specific segment of its population.


American society succumbs to the ravages of ethnocide because we are unaware of its existence. Thus far, the lack of a cultural philosophy, language, and methodology to combat ethnocidal systemic oppression has prevented america from combatting a crime that previously went unnamed.

Combating Ethnocide

To dismantle ethnocide, scl applies an interdisciplinary approach inspired by the italian renaissance that merges philosophy with art, politics, and activism. The renaissance changed european civilization by supporting philosophers and fostering their collaboration with artists. Through art, complex philosophical ideas can be easily understood by the masses and create both political and cultural sustainable activism.


Far too often groups seeking to create sustainable cultural change overlook the importance of philosophy, and this oversight undermines their mission because without philosophy we are more prone to developing reformist instead of revolutionary ideas. Reformist ideas aspire to prevent abuses of the existing system and implore people to properly use the system. Revolutionary ideas aspire to create a new system. Without philosophy revolutionary aspirations will become reformist actions.


Progressing beyond ethnocide requires philosophy, art, and activism. scl exists to create this american cultural naissance.

Combating Ethnocide

To dismantle ethnocide, scl applies an interdisciplinary approach inspired by the italian renaissance that merges philosophy with art, politics, and activism. The renaissance changed european civilization by supporting philosophers and fostering their collaboration with artists. Through art, complex philosophical ideas can be easily understood by the masses and create both political and cultural sustainable activism.


Far too often groups seeking to create sustainable cultural change overlook the importance of philosophy, and this oversight undermines their mission because without philosophy we are more prone to developing reformist instead of revolutionary ideas. Reformist ideas aspire to prevent abuses of the existing system and implore people to properly use the system. Revolutionary ideas aspire to create a new system. Without philosophy revolutionary aspirations will become reformist actions.


Progressing beyond ethnocide requires philosophy, art, and activism. scl exists to create this american cultural naissance.

“The first step in liquidating a people,’ said Hubl, ‘is to erase its memory. Destroy its books, its culture, its history. Then have somebody write new books, manufacture a new culture, invent a new history. Before long the nation will begin to forget what it is and what it was. The world around it will forget even faster.”
— Milan Kundera, The book of laughter and forgetting (1979)
EǓTOPIA
Eǔtopia is the antithesis of Ethnocide”
- Barrett Holmes Pitner
EǓTOPIA
In greek, the prefix “eu” means “good” and “topia” means “place.” Therefore, eǔtopia means “good place.” Eu is pronounced as “ev.” Eǔtopia is pronounced as “ev-topia.
Ethnocide removes culture and keeps the people to create a perpetually oppressed segment of the population. The oppressors, also known as “ethnociders,” depend on sustaining this division because they system rewards those who live off of cultural extraction and appropriation.

Ethnocide creates exploitative, parasitic relationships focused on consumption and not creation. This dystopian culture is unsustainable because its dependence on consumption will result in it consuming itself.

Eǔtopia creates and cultivates culture by forging equitable and sustainable relationships. Working for the collective good creates a sustainable culture.
Read the book
Utopia Vs. Eǔtopia

In 1516, thomas more published the satirical novel utopia about a perfect society that does not exist. More coined the word “utopia” by using the greek “topia” for place and combining the greek prefixes “eu” for “good” and “ou” for “nonexistent.” More removed the e and o to make utopia which means “nonexistent good place.” For over 500 years, the world has overlooked the satire and erroneously attempted to build impossible utopias. a utopia is a good place that does not exist.


“Eǔtopia is a good place that can exist. Eǔtopia is not perfect. It never will be. It works to be good and sustainable via constant collaboration and good faith relationships within our community.”
— Barrett Holmes Pitner

Utopia Vs. Eǔtopia

In 1516, thomas more published the satirical novel utopia about a perfect society that does not exist. More coined the word “utopia” by using the greek “topia” for place and combining the greek prefixes “eu” for “good” and “ou” for “nonexistent.” More removed the e and o to make utopia which means “nonexistent good place.” For over 500 years, the world has overlooked the satire and erroneously attempted to build impossible utopias. a utopia is a good place that does not exist.


“Eǔtopia is a good place that can exist. Eǔtopia is not perfect. It never will be. It works to be good and sustainable via constant collaboration and good faith relationships within our community.”
— Barrett Holmes Pitner

America Vs. Eǔtopia

America’s foundation of ethnocide has normalized sustained cultural division, impairing our ability to create equitable social structures and forge shared community and culture. Ethnocide’s sustained division and destruction of culture shapes our language — both spoke and unspoken — and our ideas. If our capacity to articulate, express, and imagine a society and culture beyond ethnocide is undermined due to systemic, generational ethnocide then we will struggle to build the equitable and sustainable culture that we all need.


Eǔtopia may be merely one letter from “utopia,” but life as satire is life as farce. Opting for farce because of convenience signals the end of progress.


Eǔtopia and “good places” throughout history have always prioritized public space and “the commons.” The most beautiful and sustainable cities in the world have large town squares that cultivate the communal bonds that a culture, people, and community need to survive. The beauty and intention of public space encourage a community to live up to their highest ideals.


Within ethnocidal and authoritarian societies, the oppressed are often prevented from gathering in public, and the oppressors privatize public goods and spaces. When the private is valued ahead of the public, culture gets destroyed and our basest selves dominate society.


Unlike utopia, Eǔtopia is not a perfect society that one can find beyond the horizon. It is a philosophy of daily practice and actions to cultivate equitable, good faith relationships; and working to make each of us into a “good place.” Valuing public and communal space is an essential part of this work and philosophy. This is how one builds sustainable, good culture and community.


SCL’s interdisciplinary method of merging philosophy with art and activism will allow us to engage the public sphere to combat ethnocide and create sustainable good places.

America Vs. Eǔtopia

America’s foundation of ethnocide has normalized sustained cultural division, impairing our ability to create equitable social structures and forge shared community and culture. Ethnocide’s sustained division and destruction of culture shapes our language — both spoke and unspoken — and our ideas. If our capacity to articulate, express, and imagine a society and culture beyond ethnocide is undermined due to systemic, generational ethnocide then we will struggle to build the equitable and sustainable culture that we all need.


Eǔtopia may be merely one letter from “utopia,” but life as satire is life as farce. Opting for farce because of convenience signals the end of progress.


Eǔtopia and “good places” throughout history have always prioritized public space and “the commons.” The most beautiful and sustainable cities in the world have large town squares that cultivate the communal bonds that a culture, people, and community need to survive. The beauty and intention of public space encourage a community to live up to their highest ideals.


Within ethnocidal and authoritarian societies, the oppressed are often prevented from gathering in public, and the oppressors privatize public goods and spaces. When the private is valued ahead of the public, culture gets destroyed and our basest selves dominate society.


Unlike utopia, Eǔtopia is not a perfect society that one can find beyond the horizon. It is a philosophy of daily practice and actions to cultivate equitable, good faith relationships; and working to make each of us into a “good place.” Valuing public and communal space is an essential part of this work and philosophy. This is how one builds sustainable, good culture and community.


SCL’s interdisciplinary method of merging philosophy with art and activism will allow us to engage the public sphere to combat ethnocide and create sustainable good places.

“We must become something we have never been and for which our education and experience and environment have Ill-prepared us. We must become bigger than we have been: more courageous, greater in spirit, larger in outlook. We must become members of a new race, overcoming petty prejudice, owing our ultimate allegiance not o nations but to our fellow men within the human community.”
— Haile Selassie I, address to the United Nations, October 6, 1963
FREECANO
“Our maps of the world place europe in the north and at the top because europeans created the maps. If people in the “southern” hemisphere created our maps, we would have a new perspective of the world."
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For hundreds of years African Diaspora people have engaged in a transformational journey of self-identification as they liberate themselves from the dehumanizing, ethnocidal identifiers such as nigger, negro, and coon that have been forced upon them since colonization.

To support and raise awareness of this generational linguistic endeavor, SCL has introduced the word “Freecano”.

Freecano derives from “African”, but we have removed the “A”, creating “Frican” to symbolize the forced removal and partial erasure of African culture.

Next, we changed “Frican” to “Freecan” to symbolize the culture of freedom created by diaspora peoples, as they collectively worked to free themselves from ethnocidal oppression.

Lastly, we added an “o” (which can also be an “a”, “e”, or “x”), creating “Freecano” to include the Spanish and Portuguese speaking African diaspora communities.

Freecano speaks to the cultural trauma of ethnocidal oppression, and the culture of strength, resilience, freedom and liberation that has been forged by the African Diaspora community from the onset of the transatlantic slave trade and into the present.
PRE-ORDER THE BOOK
BY BARRETT HOLMES PITNER
The Crime Without a Name guides readers through the historical origins of ethnocide – the destruction of a people’s culture while keeping the people – in the United States, while examining the personal, lived consequences of existing within an ongoing erasure.
$26.00